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When life gives you… olives? — On the Corfu Trail

“Many go for the beach and warm weather, which you can certainly do with a Falcon holiday, but out in the Ionian Sea, the Greek Island of Corfu has another attraction: the Corfu Trail”

Dotted with olive groves and valleys throughout, the Corfu Trail is a genuine journey into the island’s beautiful landscapes…

  • When life gives you… olives? — On the Corfu Trail

    Many go for the beach and warm weather, which you can certainly do with a Falcon holiday, but out in the Ionian Sea, the Greek Island of Corfu has another attraction: the Corfu Trail. Dotted with olive groves and valleys throughout, the Corfu Trail is a genuine journey into the island’s beautiful landscapes. Plus, if you can’t bear to be without the beach, worry not, because soft sands enter the equation too; and if you like olives, well, you’ll simply love the trail!

    Starting at the bottom

    Like in many other walks of life, people following the Corfu Trail start at the bottom, in this case the south of the island, and work their way up. The north of the trail is where many of its highlights lie, just waiting to be discovered.

    What do you need to walk the trail? Considering the varied terrain, from olive groves and forests to beaches and valleys, country lanes and tracks to footpaths and mountain climbs, you’ll need durable footwear. Oh and you’ll need a love for nature and a camera to capture those amazing moments as well!

    Here’s a summary of the trail and some of the main highlights:

    The olive groves

    The olive groves you’ll see on the trail aren’t just beautiful, they’re also almost literally ancient, some of them having existed for centuries. Early into the route, you’ll walk through shady olive groves into the open countryside as you head towards Lefkemmi, a town famous for its wine. Other parts of the trail where you can appreciate a trek through these handsome groves are the Lakones to Krini section of the route, and close to the town of Paleokastritsa, which nestles at the bottom of onward-looking hills.

    The peaks

    Ramblers with a head for heights will love the peaks on the trail. Agii Deka is Corfu’s second highest peak, which stands at 576 metres tall. However, there’s always somebody bigger — or in this case, some mountain — and Mount Pantokrater is happy to oblige at 917 metres. Scale the mountain to enjoy a rewarding view of the surrounding Greek Isles and nearby Albania.

    The water

    The Corfu Water

    If you adore bodies of water, you’ll definitely appreciate the trail. On your ramble, you’ll come across the Messonghi River, which separates the cute rural village of Messonghi from the resort of Moraitla. Messonghi itself was once a fishing village, but you’ll still see people out there on the banks with their rods and a desire to reinvigorate this tradition.

    Another fine body of water you’ll come across on the trail is the Lake Korission. The lake houses a variety of wildlife, such as egrets, herons and terrapins, so have your camera at the ready.

    The beaches

    The Corfu Beaches

    Offering more than golden sands, Kontogialos (Pelekas) gives gallant Corfu Trail ramblers a taste of local legend. Folklore has it that the rocks are pirates and their ship, which were turned into stone when they came to the village and abducted a bride on her wedding day.

    As you enter the closing stages of the 220 kilometre long trail, the chances are you’ll want to fall flat on your back and look up to the sky, quietly applauding your resilience. Follow the coastline over wild headland to Saint Spyridon Beach and you’ll be able to indulge in just that as, ultimately, you reach the end of your trek. You did well!

    Fancy hitting the trail? Check out a detailed route plan today, and why not book yourself a holiday with Falcon? And as for all those olive groves — well now you know why the Greek diet is so healthy!

    Additional images by marksweb and gabriel.hilohi, used under Creative Commons licence.

Author: Charlotte Brenner

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